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Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society > Volume 48(2); 2010 > Article
Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society 2010;48(2): 125-128.
doi: https://doi.org/10.3340/jkns.2010.48.2.125
The Proper Volume and Distribution of Cement Augmentation on Percutaneous Vertebroplasty.
Dong Joon Kim, Tae Wan Kim, Kwan Ho Park, Moon Pyo Chi, Jae O Kim
Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul Veterans Hospital, Seoul, Korea. colloseum@freechal.com
ABSTRACT
OBJECTIVE:
The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal volume of injected cement and its distribution when used to treat vertebral compression fractures, and to identify factors related to subsequent vertebral fractures.
METHODS:
A retrospective analysis of newly developing vertebral fractures after percutaneous vertebroplasty was done. The inclusion criteria were that the fracture was a single first onset fracture with exclusion of pathologic fractures. Forty-three patients were included in the study with a minimum follow up period of six months. Patients were dichotomized for the analysis by volume of cement, initial vertebral height loss, bone marrow density, and endplate-to-endplate cement augmentation.
RESULTS:
None of the four study variables was found to be significantly associated with the occurrence of a subsequent vertebral compression fracture. In particular, and injected cement volume of more or less that 3.5 cc was not associated with occurrence (p = 0.2523). No relation was observed between initial vertebral height loss and bone marrow density (p = 0.1652, 0.2064). Furthermore, endplate-to-endplate cement augmentation was also not found to be significantly associated with a subsequent fracture (p = 0.2860) by Fisher's exact test.
CONCLUSION:
Neither volume of cement, initial vertebral height loss, bone marrow density, or endplate-to-endplate cement augmentation was found to be significantly related to the occurrence of a subsequent vertebral compression fracture. Our findings suggest that as much cement as possible without causing leakage should be used.
Key Words: Compression fracture; Volume; Subsequent fracture
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